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CFA 18/JUL/13-a

Project name: 
Congressional Gold Medal honoring the service of Native American Code Talkers
Location: 
United States
Owner: 
U.S. Mint
Description: 
Designs for six gold medals (with silver and bronze duplicates)
Review Type: 
Final
Previous Review: 

Recommendation

Pueblo of Acoma Tribe: Obverse #2, with the rifle removed due to its weak artistry and confusing suggestion of a sloped plane for the seated soldier. Reverse #2, with the request for careful detailing to assure the legibility of the ring of numerous design elements overlapping the central field edge.

Hopi Tribe: Obverse #4, with the text "U.S. Army" replaced by "A Code Never Broken" as in alternative #1. Reverse #3, as the simplest design.

Oneida Nation: Obverse #3, due to the sense of movement and the profile pose, with the request to remove the eagle feathers as a confusing design element. Reverse #3, with the oval motif remove, and a request for careful study of the sculptural treatment of the animal prints (graphically rendered as black or white in the submitted drawings).

Ponca Tribe: Obverse #4, with the removal of the circular motif of radio waves and the secondary soldier at the far lower left; the remaining portraits should also be adjusted so that the soldier's helmet does not obscure Chief White Eagle's chin. Reverse #1, the only submitted alternative, as a clear and simple design.

Tonto Apache Tribe: Obverse #1, due to the sense of movement, the profile pose, and the clear two–figure composition. Reverse #1, as the simplest and most dramatic of the alternatives.

White Mountain Apache Tribe: Obverse #3, due to the interesting composition incorporating a background silhouette portrait, with a request for further refinement of the foreground soldier's bent leg. Reverse #1, the only submitted alternative, with a request to slightly reduce the size of the emblem within the textured field to improve the clarity of this complex composition.

Letter

19 July 2013

Dear Mr. Peterson:

In its meeting of 18 July, the Commission of Fine Arts reviewed the design submission for six Congressional Gold Medals in the series honoring the service of Native American code talkers, and adopted the following recommendations on the Consent Calendar:

Pueblo of Acoma Tribe:

Obverse #2, with the rifle removed due to its weak artistry and confusing suggestion of a sloped plane for the seated soldier.

Reverse #2, with the request for careful detailing to assure the legibility of the ring of numerous design elements overlapping the central field edge.

Hopi Tribe:

Obverse #4, with the text "U.S. Army" replaced by "A Code Never Broken" as in alternative #1.

Reverse #3, as the simplest design.

Oneida Nation:

Obverse #3, due to the sense of movement and the profile pose, with the request to remove the eagle feathers as a confusing design element.

Reverse #3, with the oval motif removed, and a request for careful study of the sculptural treatment of the animal prints (graphically rendered as black or white in the submitted drawings).

Ponca Tribe:

Obverse #4, with the removal of the circular motif of radio waves and the secondary soldier at the far lower left; the remaining portraits should also be adjusted so that the soldier's helmet does not obscure Chief White Eagle's chin.

Reverse #1, the only submitted alternative, as a clear and simple design.

Tonto Apache Tribe:

Obverse #1, due to the sense of movement, the profile pose, and the clear two-figure composition.

Reverse #1, as the simplest and most dramatic of the alternatives.

White Mountain Apache Tribe:

Obverse #3, due to the interesting composition incorporating a background silhouette portrait, with a request for further refinement of the foreground soldier's bent leg.

Reverse #1, the only submitted alternative, with a request to slightly reduce the size of the emblem within the textured field to improve the clarity of this complex composition.

As always, the staff is available to assist you with future submissions.

Sincerely,

/s/Thomas E. Luebke, FAIA
Secretary

Richard Peterson, Acting Director
United States Mint
801 9th Street, NW, 8th Floor
Washington, DC 20220